Home Health Sun cream contour TikTok trend: Why you should NEVER try this harmful...

Sun cream contour TikTok trend: Why you should NEVER try this harmful trend

0


Contouring is a makeup trick that makes your face and body seem slimmer and more defined, and in recent years people have used fake tan to contour their body. By allowing your skin to darken in specific areas, you can trick the eye into thinking you have toned legs and chiselled abs. Now, TikTokers have created a more permanent solution that involves contouring with sun cream. Express.co.uk reveals why you should avoid the trend.

Contouring is a makeup technique that has been around for ages and was originally introduced by Drag Queens who wanted to create more ‘feminine’ features.

This makeup hack can be used on the jawline or cheekbones to slim your face down or even on the rest of your body to make your muscles stand out.

In recent years, makeup artists have been using fake tan to create a longer-lasting fake tan… and TikTokers have taken this tip one step further and come up with ‘sunscreen contouring’.

READ MORE-  Stacey Solomon exasperated by Gwyneth Paltrow ‘dangerous’ advice

Why you should NEVER try this harmful trend

Contouring with sun cream is dangerous and misleading.

Not only will this hack probably not give you the effect you’re looking for, but it also puts you at a much higher risk of premature ageing and skin cancers.

The SPF number tells you how long the sun’s rays would take to burn your skin when using the cream compared to the time it would take to burn your skin without any sun cream on at all.

SPF is not about how dark your skin will go, it is about how quickly it will take you to burn!

If you’re wearing SPF 30, it should take you 30 times longer to burn than without sun cream.

Sunscreens with higher SPF will also, in theory, allow less of the harmful rays through to your skin.

You should not be treating one area of your skin differently from another because being burnt once every two years can triple your risk of melanoma skin cancer.

The NHS website advises everyone to use two teaspoons of sunscreen on their head, face, arms and neck. You’ll need an extra two tablespoons to cover your entire body while wearing a swimming costume.



LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here