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Qantas executives enjoyed 'wellness festival' with PUPPY therapy – while passengers were miserable

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Pampered Qantas executives indulged in puppy therapy and Zumba classes during work hours while passengers queued for hours because Australian airports botched a surge in demand.

The airline’s high-flying managers enjoyed a week of activities during a ‘wellness festival’ at its spacious Sydney headquarters, including patting a ‘therapeutic puppy to take the stress away’.

Exhausted and furious passengers queued for up to three hours and even missed flights at Sydney because of the chaos.

It is widely believed airline and airport executives could have predicted the disaster caused by staff shortages and booming ticket sales.

Joyce claimed the painfully slow queues on Thursday and Friday at Sydney Airport were caused by travellers who are not ‘match fit’

Exhausted and furious passengers queued for up to two and a half hours and even missed flights at Sydney, but also in Melbourne and Brisbane after Qantas executives de-stressed by patting therapy dogs

Exhausted and furious passengers queued for up to two and a half hours and even missed flights at Sydney, but also in Melbourne and Brisbane after Qantas executives de-stressed by patting therapy dogs 

Pampered Qantas executives indulged in puppy therapy and Zumba classes in work hours before passengers queued for hours as Australian airports botched a surge in demand (pictured, the timetable for Qantas executives cruisy week before the airport chaos ensued)

Pampered Qantas executives indulged in puppy therapy and Zumba classes in work hours before passengers queued for hours as Australian airports botched a surge in demand (pictured, the timetable for Qantas executives cruisy week before the airport chaos ensued)

As the airport began to fill up, Qantas executives eased back to their corporate HQ with a cruisy week filled with a chilled-out program, 9News revealed.

They meditated, did yoga, pilates, got their bicycles repaired and listened to ‘groovy music’ during work hours as part of the ‘campus activities’ between April 4 and 8 at Mascot.

On Qantas’s internal social network, staff blasted bosses for being out of touch with the reality of passenger demand in airports.

Airport check in wait times are expected to worsen from Easter to Anzac Day

Airport check in wait times are expected to worsen from Easter to Anzac Day

On Wednesday Sydney Airport CEO Geoff Culbert promised to put executives to work in terminals as he apologised in advance for the airport crush that was likely to worsen

On Wednesday Sydney Airport CEO Geoff Culbert promised to put executives to work in terminals as he apologised in advance for the airport crush that was likely to worsen

‘The perspective of operational staff is that there is a total disconnect from those on ‘the campus’ to what is happening in reality,’ an employee said in a post, the Daily Telegraph reported.

A pilot said ‘in 27 years I’ve never seen it anywhere near this bad’, noting he was pleased to be able to lock the cabin door and leave ground staff and crew to face the passenger’s wrath.

While Qantas was not responsible for the blow-out in wait times at airports – which is expected to worsen from Easter to Anzac Day – its CEO did partly blame the traveling public for the queues.

Alan Joyce claimed the painfully slow queues last weekend at Sydney Airport were caused by travellers slowing up staff trying to process passengers because they are not ‘match fit’.

‘I went through the airports on Wednesday and people forget they need to take out their laptops, they have to take out their aerosols,’ he told the Daily Telegraph.

Mr Joyce later apologised, but his comments were echoed by Sydney airport’s general manager of operations.

On Qantas's internal social network, staff blasted bosses for being out of touch with the reality of passenger demand in airports

On Qantas’s internal social network, staff blasted bosses for being out of touch with the reality of passenger demand in airports

Sydney Airport expects to see 910,000 passengers use just its domestic terminal between April 14 and 26 - including 82,000 on Thursday, the most since the pandemic started

Sydney Airport expects to see 910,000 passengers use just its domestic terminal between April 14 and 26 – including 82,000 on Thursday, the most since the pandemic started

Greg Hay said that passengers were forgetting to take laptops out of bags and that they couldn’t travel with aerosol cans.

‘We’ve also noticed people are a little out of practice with security protocols, for example not taking laptops and aerosols out of their bag at screening points, which is contributing to the queues,’ Mr Hay said.

Normally passengers flying interstate are told to arrive an hour early for smooth check-ins but all airports are warning people to come at least two hours early for flights between Easter and Anzac Day a week later. 

On Wednesday Sydney Airport CEO Geoff Culbert promised to put executives to work in terminals as he apologised in advance for the airport crush that was likely to worsen.

Normally passengers flying interstate are told to arrive an hour early for smooth check-ins but all airports are warning people to come at least two hours early for flights between Easter and Anzac Day a week later

Normally passengers flying interstate are told to arrive an hour early for smooth check-ins but all airports are warning people to come at least two hours early for flights between Easter and Anzac Day a week later

Sydney Airport expects to see 910,000 passengers use just its domestic terminal between April 14 and 26 – including 82,000 on Thursday, the most since the pandemic started.

‘I know it’s a difficult message to hear but Thursday is going to be another tough day for travellers, and I want to apologise in advance to anyone who is inconvenienced.

‘Tomorrow and right through the school holidays we are pulling every lever available to us to get people on their way safely, including deploying senior executives and staff into our terminals to manage queues and ensure people make their flights.’

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