Home U.S New Virginia bill will fine anyone who sends unsolicited nudes $500

New Virginia bill will fine anyone who sends unsolicited nudes $500

68
0


New Virginia law clamps down on ‘digital flashing’ and sets $500 fine for anyone who sends unsolicited nudes

  • On Monday, Virginia lawmakers passed a bill that will make it illegal to electronically send an unsolicited nude photo
  • The bill, spearheaded by state Senator Jennifer McClellan, was backed by the dating app Bumble that has a digital campaign to make ‘digital flashing’ illegal
  • According to 2018 study, one in three women on Bumble reported having received unsolicited lewd photos from someone they had not met in person  
  • Bumble previously worked on a similar bill in Texas in 2019 and are working on passing legislation in California, Wisconsin, New York and Pennsylvania

Virginians who sends explicit images without the consent of the receiver will be fined $500 under a state law set to take effect in July. 

Lawmakers on Monday passed a bill that will make it illegal to electronically send an unsolicited nude photo.

Violators will be liable ‘for actual damages or $500, whichever is greater, in addition to reasonable attorney fees and costs,’ according to the bill.  

Lawmakers on Monday passed a bill that will make it illegal to electronically send an unsolicited nude photo

Lawmakers on Monday passed a bill that will make it illegal to electronically send an unsolicited nude photo

The bill, spearheaded by Democratic senator Jennifer McClellan (pictured), was backed by the dating app Bumble, which helped work on the legislation

The bill, spearheaded by Democratic senator Jennifer McClellan (pictured), was backed by the dating app Bumble, which helped work on the legislation

The bill, spearheaded by Democratic senator Jennifer McClellan, was backed by the dating app Bumble, which helped work on the legislation and has a digital campaign to make sending unsolicited lewd photos, or ‘digital flashing,’ illegal. 

The dating app previously worked on a similar bill in Texas in 2019 and are working on passing legislation in California, Wisconsin, New York and Pennsylvania. 

According to 2018 study commissioned by the dating app, one in three women on Bumble reported having received unsolicited lewd photos, or nudes, from someone they had not met in person and 96 percent of those women said they were unhappy to have been sent these images. 

‘We’re proud to have played a part in bringing standards of conduct on the internet closer in line with our standards of behavior in the real world,’ Bumble said in a statement following the passing of the bill.

‘If it wouldn’t fly walking down the street—or at the office, or in the classroom—it shouldn’t be tolerated in your inbox!’ 

According to the National Association of Attorneys General, 2 percent of Americans reported being victims of nonconsensual porn in 2016. 

By 2017, it jumped to 12 percent among those in the 18-29 age group. A 2019 study had a 400 percent increase from 2016.

‘Taken as a whole, these statistics show the number of victims continues to rise at an alarming rate even though both the legal system and society as a whole have attempted to address the issue,’ according to the association. 

Advertisement

Previous articleMichelle Keegan looks incredible as she goes make-up free in the gym before heading to buy some booze
Next articleHow boobs have grown with the times – from Henry VIII’s ‘bee-sting’ beauties to Bridgerton’s buxom bosoms

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here