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Neo-Nazi couple with four children jailed after buying 3D printer to make handgun in family home 

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A neo-Nazi couple with four children, who bought a 3D printer and tried to make a handgun in the family home, have both been jailed after they were found guilty of firearms offences.

Liam Hall, 31, and Stacey Salmon, 30, lived on a council estate in Keighley, West Yorkshire, where police found the weapon in the kitchen, along with chemicals used to make bombs in pans on the stove.

Using a 3D printer, Hall had ‘printed’ plastic parts for the firearm, called the PG22 MkII, which could then be assembled together with metal components to create functional and lethal firearm.

Stacey Salmon, 30, who also lived on the council estate in Keighley, West Yorkshire, was jailed for three years for making a 3d printed gun at home

Stacey Salmon, 30, who also lived on the council estate in Keighley, West Yorkshire, was jailed for three years for making a 3d printed gun at home

An electric hot plate with black powder residue which had been used to manufacture explosives was found in the kitchen, but the couple told the court they were making rockets for their children during lockdown.

At Sheffield Crown Court, Hall was handed a six-year sentence for manufacturing a firearm and possessing a firearm and Salmon was jailed for three years for possessing a firearm.

They were aided in making the firearm by Hall’s best friend, Daniel Wright, 30, who lived in the next street in Braithwaite, Keighley, and was a frequent visitor to the family home.

Liam Hall and Salmon were found guilty of possessing the printed weapon but acquitted of having it for terrorist purposes

Liam Hall and Salmon were found guilty of possessing the printed weapon but acquitted of having it for terrorist purposes

Wright had joined an encrypted chat room that put out far-right propaganda aimed at radicalising members, including children, and providing instructions on using weapons.

He was jailed for 12 years for manufacturing a firearm and possession of a stash of electronic publications, including terrorist manuals and books providing detailed instructions on killing and the manufacture of improvised explosives and firearms.

Salmon told the jury at Sheffield Crown Court that she had become interested in chemistry because she and her partner wanted to educate their children during lockdown

Salmon told the jury at Sheffield Crown Court that she had become interested in chemistry because she and her partner wanted to educate their children during lockdown

A fourth man, Samuel Whibley, 29, from Anglesey, North Wales, ran the chat room used by Wright and had researched the manufacture of another firearm, called a FGC-9, and posted links and a files online to enable others to manufacture the semi-automatic pistol-calibre carbine.

He was jailed for ten years on eight counts of encouragement of terrorism and disseminating terrorist material.

Annabel Darlow, QC, had told Sheffield Crown Court that the four defendants were members of an ‘extreme fascist cell during the first four months of 2021’.

She told the jury that the four members ’embraced extreme right-wing propaganda and celebrated racist violence and killing’.

An image on Salmon’s phone was found showing her with scarf wrapped around her face, making a Nazi salute and a second showing her wearing a face mask with a skull print, appropriated by the far right.

On the anniversary of Hitler’s birth on April 20, 2021, Salmon sent Wright an image of a birthday cake with the words ‘Happy Birthday Adolf Hitler’ written in icing which Wright then shared on the telegram chat group.

Hall had'printed' plastic parts for the firearm, called the PG22 MkII, which could then be assembled together with metal components to create functional and lethal firearm

Hall had ‘printed’ plastic parts for the firearm, called the PG22 MkII, which could then be assembled together with metal components to create functional and lethal firearm

In court, Hall confessed to believing that ‘international Jews own the media’ and admitted to being a fascist but said he was ‘not a fan’ of Nazis.

Asked if he had a hatred of Jews, Hall replied: ‘No, a specific type of Jews – the bankers, the ruling class – but I wouldn’t suggest I hate them, it is a very strong word, dislike is enough.’

Salmon told the jury at Sheffield Crown Court that she had become interested in chemistry because she and her partner wanted to educate their children during lockdown.

The chemicals found in the kitchen were for making rockets because she had become interested in Elon Musk’s space programme and she purchased them on eBay, she said.

The couple had paid £134 for a 3D printer because Hall, a welder, wanted to make toys on it and, if he got good enough, to sell toys online, Salmon said.

She was asked why she had sent a message to Hall saying: ‘Love you lots and hate the Jews’ and explained that she had been watching lots of Youtube videos and developed a dislike of ‘Zionists’.

Hall and Wright were found guilty of manufacturing the handgun and Wright was found guilty of possessing the firearm for terrorism after he boasted about it online to an undercover police officer.

Hall and Salmon were found guilty of possessing the printed weapon but acquitted of having it for terrorist purposes after telling the jury it was intended as a toy gun and did not work because the plastic was not strong enough.

However, Wright was also found guilty of one charge of disseminating terrorist publications and three charges of possessing terrorist information.

Whibley was found guilty of seven charges of dissemination and one of encouraging terrorism.

Police said the four individuals ‘came together in a private online chat group to share extreme right-wing views and propaganda, influence and indoctrinate others and endorse the use of violence to further their cause’.

Detective Chief Superintendent Peter Craig, head of Counter-Terrorism Policing North East, said: ‘Today’s outcome highlights the seriousness of the offences committed by these individuals.

Daniel Wright, 29, of Keighley, West Yorkshire, called himself'Gott Mit Uns', a German saying stamped on the belt buckle of Nazi soldiers during the Second World War, meaning'god is with us'

Daniel Wright, 29, of Keighley, West Yorkshire, called himself ‘Gott Mit Uns’, a German saying stamped on the belt buckle of Nazi soldiers during the Second World War, meaning ‘god is with us’

‘We work tirelessly to identify individuals who have an extremist mindset and threaten the safety and unity of our diverse communities.

‘Anyone found to be engaging in terrorist activity, or violent extremism in any form, can expect to be identified and put before the courts’.

Nick Price, head of the CPS Counter-Terrorism Division, said: ‘The views and ideologies expressed by these four defendants were abhorrent and repulsive. 

‘The material that was shared amongst themselves and on a public forum, and the attempt by two of the group to manufacture firearms using a 3D printer was highly dangerous. 

‘The Counter-Terrorism Division presented evidence to show that their views and actions posed a threat to our society, and it is right that today they have been sentenced for their offences.’

Wright and Whibley, who never met, used a Telegram channel called Oaken Hearth which had been set up by Whibley in early January 2021.

Within the channel was a private group, called Oaken Hearth Chat, which was accessible only to those who passed a series of questions, aimed at ensuring they had an extreme right-wing mentality.

Wright purchased a Remington WarHawk .22 inch scope, costing £199.98, along with a bow and a package of hunting arrow quiver tips, from an online website in February 2021

Wright purchased a Remington WarHawk .22 inch scope, costing £199.98, along with a bow and a package of hunting arrow quiver tips, from an online website in February 2021 

The channel was used to share propaganda by members of the extreme right-wing to radicalise and indoctrinate members, and to provide them with the information and encouragement necessary to carry out acts of terrorism.

Ms Darlow told the court: ‘Despite it being apparent that certain users of the chat were children, this in no way deterred those involved from the process of radicalisation and the repeated provision of detailed information on matters including the manufacture of home-made firearms.’

Whibley selected the username ‘Black Sun Hydra’ and posed for photographs in front of an image of the black sun symbol – which originated with the Nazi SS – masked and brandishing a large combat knife.

Wright called himself ‘Gott Mit Uns’, a German saying stamped on the belt buckle of Nazi soldiers during the Second World War, meaning ‘god is with us.’

The chat group celebrated extreme right-wing terrorists who had committed acts of mass murder and praised them as ‘saints’, including Timothy McVeigh, who killed 168 people with a truck bomb in Oklahoma, Anders Breivik who murdered 77 people in Norway, and Brenton Tarrant, who shot 51 worshippers in two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand.

The chemicals found in the kitchen were for making rockets because she had become interested in Elon Musk's space programme and she purchased them on eBay, Salmon claimed

The chemicals found in the kitchen were for making rockets because she had become interested in Elon Musk’s space programme and she purchased them on eBay, Salmon claimed 

Responding to a post by Wright on January 18, 2021, that ‘the day of the rope is coming guys,’ Whibley wrote: ‘I can’t wait. We will make Enoch Powell proud’ — a reference to the politician who predicted in 1968 that large-scale immigration from the developing world to the UK would result in ‘rivers of blood’. 

The ‘day of the rope’ was a reference to a chapter in a notorious book called ‘The Turner Diaries’ featuring the hanging of mixed-race couples from lampposts.

Wright purchased a Remington WarHawk .22 inch scope, costing £199.98, along with a bow and a package of hunting arrow quiver tips, from an online website on February 1, 2021.

A document titled ‘Prison Killing Techniques’, which included detailed instructions on anatomical targets, weapons and improvised explosive devices was posted onto the chat by Whibley on February 25 2021.

He also told users to get a knife, recommending different brands and posting images of a bushcraft knife and sheath, adding on March 18: ‘We need to move underground, build numbers hard and strike fast.’

On the following day, he encouraged users to post images of their knives and on April 30, he posted the image of himself dressed in black, with a black balaclava and a skull mask, holding a large knife with a serrated blade.

He was posing in front of a black sun backdrop and had another image of the black sun on his outer clothing with the word ‘Hydra’, his Telegram logon.

‘The clear implication was that he was prepared to use extreme violence in pursuit of his ideology,’ Ms Darlow said.

Wright commented ‘cool mother fu****.’

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