Home Science Neanderthals cared for dental hygiene: 46,000-year-old teeth show signs of toothpick use

Neanderthals cared for dental hygiene: 46,000-year-old teeth show signs of toothpick use

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“Due to climatic conditions, this was where the best living conditions prevailed.”

A similar discovery was presented four years ago in the Bulletin of the International Association for Paleodontology.

Neanderthal remains found near Kripina in modern-day Croatia had similar grooves etched into the teeth but made much earlier – about 130,000 years ago.

In this case, however, the Neanderthal may have been dealing with a toothache and not bits of food stuck between teeth.

David Frayer, professor emeritus of Anthropology at the University of Kansas, said: “As a package, this fits together as a dental problem that the Neanderthal was having and was trying to presumably treat itself, with the toothpick grooves, the breaks and also with the scratches on the premolar.



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