Home News Mysterious, mirrored monolith appears in Nevada desert

Mysterious, mirrored monolith appears in Nevada desert


In a déjà vu moment, a mysterious, mirrored monolith has appeared in the Nevada desert, reminiscent of several that cropped up around the world in 2020.

Las Vegas Search & Rescue volunteers found this blast from the pandemic past — or evidence of alien visitation, take your pick — nonchalantly nestled in a remote mountain range about 20 miles north of Las Vegas, near Gass Peak in the Desert National Wildlife Refuge. Normally one would see only the bighorn sheep and desert tortoises that populate the sanctuary.

This photo provided by Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department shows a monolith near Gass Peak, Nev., on Sunday, June 16, 2024. Jutting out of the rocks on a remote mountain peak near Las Vegas, the glimmering rectangular prism's reflective surface imitates the vast desert landscape surrounding the mountain peak where it has been erected. (Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department via AP)
This photo provided by Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department shows a monolith near Gass Peak, Nev., on Sunday, June 16, 2024. (Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department via AP)

“We see a lot of weird things when people go hiking, like not being prepared for the weather, not bringing enough water,” the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department tweeted Tuesday on X. “But check this out!”

The rectangular prism perched overlooking the distant Las Vegas valley immediately brings to mind Stanley Kubrick’s 1968 sci-fi classic, “2001: A Space Odyssey.”

The 2020 monoliths — which appeared in such disparate places as Utah, Romania, California, and New Mexico — were 10-12 feet-high prisms, all but the Romanian one smooth. Taken down or vanished within days — one within hours — of their appearance, the monoliths were never fully explained, though theories abounded about their origins.

Las Vegas police wasted no time scratching their heads over how the new monolith got to the remote, hard-to-access spot, before using the attention to turn the sighting into a public service announcement about heated hiking.

“While the internet gets to work on this mystery, remember: when enjoying our incredible outdoors, use the TRAIL acronym,” the department wrote, urging hikers to tell someone where they’re planning to go and when they expect to return; thoroughly research the weather forecast before setting out; bring first aid supplies and plenty of extra food and water; pack for inclement weather and a potential overnight stay, and don’t forget a light source.

The warning was especially cogent given the heat wave enveloping much of the U.S. this week. In the Las Vegas area, triple-digit temperatures are expected.

The recent deaths of several tourists who went hiking or took a seemingly innocuous stroll on some of Greece’s islands during blistering heat underscored the need to be aware of the effects high temperatures can have during even just a short walk.

With News Wire Services

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here