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Millions of workers are still working from temporary home office – a year on

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Working from home ... one year on

Working from home … one year on (Image: )

Three percent of respondents even claim to still be working inside a walk-in wardrobe, while nine percent have simply set up their office in the middle of a room. And three in 10 grumble they have no natural light over their working area – with 65 percent convinced this affects their productivity.

It also emerged the average worker is getting just 22 minutes a day of natural light, during two short snatched breaks from the “desk”.

And at least one day a week is spent indoors for the full 24 hours.

Perhaps understandably, British workers are therefore feeling fatigued by 2pm in the afternoon, experiencing a slump in energy and focus.

Stephen Beresford, from window expert REHAU which commissioned the research, said: “Many workers will still be waiting to see if they can return to the office, although life is looking like it might be more flexible moving forward.

“So it is probably time to consider turning these makeshift set-ups into something more permanent.

“As well as securing a calm and tidy working environment, being situated near a window, so that you can get natural light all day long and open it up for fresh air on a nice day, can really help productivity and enthusiasm.”

The study found a lack of natural light makes 24 percent of adults feel less creative, while 36 percent think it definitely contributes to lack of motivation.

Just under half feel more tired if they haven’t sat near a window or been outside, while 35 percent claim to be grumpier.

However, it emerged productivity and inspiration at home isn’t just affected by a lack of lighting and a terrible desk set-up.

As many as three in 10 adults polled via OnePoll suffer body discomfort from sitting down for too long, while 25 percent are easily side tracked when experiencing technical issues.

Boredom, feeling the need to carry out household chores, and knowing the sun is shining outside are also chief distractions.

As are spouses or children being at home, home-schooling, and listening to noisy neighbours.

Not having the right equipment, and experiencing headaches from too much screen time – as well as too many zoom calls – also mean workers struggle to focus.

Moving forward, four in 10 adults plan to find a solution to their inability to work productively 100 percent of the time at home, by improving their work set-up.

Of these, one fifth will move the working area next to a window, 34 percent want to redecorate the existing space they are in, and 35 percent would simply like a desk to work at.

Stephen Beresford added: “Brits will soon be likely to make the decision whether to move back to the office full time, or invest in home renovations and preparations to make a permanent suitable set-up at home.

“The difficulty has been that we’ve never really known how temporary or makeshift our set-ups would be, no one really expected to be in this situation 12 months on.”

TOP 20 WORK DISTRACTIONS

1. Body discomfort from sitting down for too long

2. Technical issues

3. Boredom and lack of stimulation from “real life” people and teammates 

4. Household chores

5. Headaches from too much screen time

6. Having someone at the door/your home phone ringing

7. Thinking ‘I should really go for a walk’

8. Getting side-tracked reading / watching the news

9. Knowing the sun is shining outside

10. Making tea

11. Notifications pinging from your phone

12. Other people in the house walking into your workspace / chatting

13. Partner being at home

14. Kids

15. Going outside for a walk

16. Not having a proper work space

17. Seeing dust/mess and deciding to clean the room/house

18. Too many Zoom calls

19. Waiting for a delivery to come

20. Noise from neighbours



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