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Michelle Carter seen for the first time since leaving jail after early release for manslaughter

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The 25-year-old woman convicted of manslaughter after she encouraged her boyfriend to kill himself has been spotted for the first time since being released early for good behavior.     

Michelle Carter, of Plainville, Massachusetts, was spotted doing yard work outside her home with short, bleach blonde hair while wearing black shorts and a Falmouth University hoodie. 

Wednesday’s appearance comes days after a new miniseries – The Girl from Plainville, starring Elle Fanning and Chloe Sevigny – premiered on Hulu, portraying the real life events that led Carter, then 17, to goad Conrad Roy III, 18, to go through with his suicide via phone calls and texts when he was having second thoughts. 

Michelle Carter, 25, was pictured for the first time on Wednesday in two years after being released early for good behavior in 2020, serving only 11 months of a 15-month sentence for the 2014 manslaughter of her boyfriend, Conrad Roy III

Michelle Carter, 25, was pictured for the first time on Wednesday in two years after being released early for good behavior in 2020, serving only 11 months of a 15-month sentence for the 2014 manslaughter of her boyfriend, Conrad Roy III

Carter was seen doing yard work with short, bleach blonde hair while wearing black shorts and a Falmouth University hoodie

Carter was seen doing yard work with short, bleach blonde hair while wearing black shorts and a Falmouth University hoodie 

It was unknown where Carter currently lives, but the photos of her doing yard work confirms she's still in her Plainview home

It was unknown where Carter currently lives, but the photos of her doing yard work confirms she’s still in her Plainview home

Carter was convicted of manslaughter in 2017 for her role in Conrad Roy III's (pictured) suicide. Call logs and text messages showed Carter, then 17, goaded Roy into going through with his suicide when he was having second thoughts

Carter was convicted of manslaughter in 2017 for her role in Conrad Roy III’s (pictured) suicide. Call logs and text messages showed Carter, then 17, goaded Roy into going through with his suicide when he was having second thoughts

Carter was released early from Bristol County Jail for good behavior on January 23, 2020 (pictured)

Carter was released early from Bristol County Jail for good behavior on January 23, 2020 (pictured)

Carter was last pictured leaving jail on January 23, 2020, and it was unknown if she was still living in Plainville, but the recent photos of her doing yard work around the house show that she’s still home living with her parents, Gail and David Carter. 

Following Roy’s death on July 12, 2014, Carter was convicted of manslaughter in 2017 for her role in his suicide and sentenced to 15 months in prison following a lengthy, high profile court case, but she was released four months early after earning credit for good behavior. 

Roy’s mother, Lynn St Denis, said she was speaking with her troubled son on the day of his death when he interrupted her to check on a text message from his car, believed to be the text of Carter telling Roy to go through with his suicide when he expressed doubts about killing himself and leaving his loved ones behind, People Magazine reported.  

After walking out the door, Roy got in his pickup truck, drove to a nearby Kmart and parked behind the store. There, he rigged his vehicle to fill the cabin with carbon monoxide.

The outing on Wednesday comes days after Hulu premiered The Girl from Plainville, a miniseries crime drama that portrayed Carter and Roy's relationship and the events leading up to his death

 The outing on Wednesday comes days after Hulu premiered The Girl from Plainville, a miniseries crime drama that portrayed Carter and Roy’s relationship and the events leading up to his death

Carter was seen silently doing some yard work, blowing away leaves and picking up twigs, outside her home in Plainview

Carter was seen silently doing some yard work, blowing away leaves and picking up twigs, outside her home in Plainview

Although it is unknown which college Carter graduated from, the hoodie suggests she attended Falmouth University

Although it is unknown which college Carter graduated from, the hoodie suggests she attended Falmouth University

Evidence presented at the trial showed Carter had goaded Roy to commit suicide when he was having doubts

Evidence presented at the trial showed Carter had goaded Roy to commit suicide when he was having doubts

The trail was widely known as the'Suicide Texting Case.' Carter (right) is pictured with her lawyer moments before she was sentenced to 15-month in prison in 2017 for manslaughter for her role in Roy's death

The trail was widely known as the ‘Suicide Texting Case.’ Carter (right) is pictured with her lawyer moments before she was sentenced to 15-month in prison in 2017 for manslaughter for her role in Roy’s death 

Elle Fanning (center) played Carter in the new Hulu series, The Girl From Plainville, which premiered last week

Elle Fanning (center) played Carter in the new Hulu series, The Girl From Plainville, which premiered last week

As Roy was slowly poisoning himself, he had a momentary change of heart and got out of the vehicle, but phone records presented at Carter’s trial revealed that she called her boyfriend and urged him to get back inside his truck.

Other evidence included text messages that Carter, then 17, sent to Conrad earlier in the day, as he was sitting in the car during the outing with his mother.

In those texts, Carter told the depressed teen: ‘You just need to do it, Conrad…No more pushing it off. No more waiting.’

She also had suggested to him several methods of suicide, ‘why don’t you just drink bleach? Hang yourself…jump over a building, stab yourself, idk.’ there’s a lot of ways.’

When Roy continued to show hesitance, Carter texted, ‘You’d better not be bulls******* me and just pretending. Tonight is the night, it’s now or never,’ according to court documents. 

Carter never called authorities or Roy’s parents as he died. She later texted his mother to express her sympathy, but made no mention of having prior knowledge of Roy’s plans to kill himself.

According to prosecutors, Carter told a friend that she could have stopped Roy in the moments leading up to his death as she wrote: ‘His death is my fault. Like, honestly I could have stopped it. 

‘I was the one on the phone with him and he got out of the car because [it] was working and he got scared and I f***ing told him to get back in … because I knew that he would do it all over again the next day and I couldn’t have him live the way he was living anymore.

‘Like, I should have did more. And it’s all my fault because I could have stopped him but I f***ing didn’t. And all I had to say was I love you and don’t do this one more time and he’d still be here.’  

Lynn St Denis (above), Roy's mother, opened up about the case ahead of the eighth anniversary of his death

Lynn St Denis (above), Roy’s mother, opened up about the case ahead of the eighth anniversary of his death

Roy (pictured) was talking with his mother when he reportedly recieved one of Carter's texts in support of his suicide. His family has since been lobbying for the passage of Conrad's Law, which would make Massachusetts the 43rd state to criminalize suicide coercion and make it punishable by up to five years in prison

Roy (pictured) was talking with his mother when he reportedly recieved one of Carter’s texts in support of his suicide. His family has since been lobbying for the passage of Conrad’s Law, which would make Massachusetts the 43rd state to criminalize suicide coercion and make it punishable by up to five years in prison

The young couple (portrayed in the Hulu series above) met in Florida in 2012, but had only seen each other in person a handful of times even though they lived just 35 miles apart in Massachusetts

The young couple (portrayed in the Hulu series above) met in Florida in 2012, but had only seen each other in person a handful of times even though they lived just 35 miles apart in Massachusetts

Carter's defense insisted that Roy was on the path to take his own life for years, and that it was his idea to commit suicide

Carter’s defense insisted that Roy was on the path to take his own life for years, and that it was his idea to commit suicide

The young couple met in Florida in 2012, but had only seen each other in person a handful of times even though they lived just 35 miles apart in Massachusetts — Roy in Mattapoisett and Carter in Plainville. They communicated mostly through text messages and phone calls.

In dozens of those texts and calls, Carter encouraged Roy to take his own life.   

During her high-profile trial in 2017, prosecutors argued that Carter played a ‘sick game’ with another person’s life to get attention. 

Carter’s defense attorney insisted that Roy was on the path to take his own life for years, and that it was his idea to commit suicide, not hers. The lawyer also noted that his client had her own mental health issues and was taking medications that may have clouded her judgment.  

In the end, Carter was found guilty of manslaughter. In 2019, she entered the Bristol County jail in Dartmouth, Massachusetts to begin serving her 15-month sentence.

Conrad Roy Jr, the dead teen’s father, said seeing Carter brought to justice ‘doesn’t matter.’ He added, ‘Nothing’s going to bring my son back.’

St Denis, however, said she was both ‘surprised’ and ‘satisfied’ that Carter was convicted and given prison time for her son’s death. 

‘I wish I knew how he felt when she was messaging that whole month [before Conrad died],’ she said. ‘I wish I knew what he was thinking. Was she really a friend, or did she really care about him? I mean, for someone to do what she did, how could he think that she cared?’ 

St Denis’ said her focus now is not on Carter, but on her work lobbying for the passage of Conrad’s Law, which would make Massachusetts the 43rd state to criminalize suicide coercion and make it punishable by up to five years in prison. 

‘He was just a vulnerable teenager that suffered from social anxiety and depression,’ she said. ‘I don’t want another family to deal with what I had to deal with.’

The grieving mom said she is hopeful that the star-studded Hulu show would bring attention to her efforts to have Conrad’s Law passed.  

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