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Insulate Britain activist Emma Smart moved from HMP Bronzefield to hospital wing amid hunger strike

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A jailed Insulate Britain activist on hunger strike while in prison has been moved from her cell to a hospital wing, say fellow group members.

The eco-activists say prison staff at HMP Bronzefield, Surrey, have become ‘increasingly concerned’ about the health of Emma Smart.

The 44-year-old, a biologist from Weymouth, has been on hunger strike for the past 13 days since being jailed for her part in Insulate Britain’s road-blocking protests.

Today the group said in a post on Twitter: ‘Emma, who has today been in prison on hunger strike for 13 days, was moved out of her cell onto the hospital wing at HMP Bronzefield on Friday. 

‘The prison is becoming increasingly concerned about her health.’

A spokesman for Insulate Britain told MailOnline that Smart was not in a critical condition.

‘She’s been moved to the hospital wing because she’s going through some stuff,’  the spokesperson said.

‘She’s bearing up. She’s not in a critical condition.’

Jailed Insulate Britain activist Emma Smart (pictured), who is on hunger strike while in prison, has been taken to hospital, the group say

Smart, 44, has been on hunger strike for 13 days since being jailed for her parts in Insulate Britain's disruptive road-blocking protests

Smart, 44, has been on hunger strike for 13 days since being jailed for her parts in Insulate Britain’s disruptive road-blocking protests

Smart was imprisoned with eight other people from Insulate Britain (pictured: An Insulate Britain protest) who were given sentences of between three and six months and were each ordered to pay costs of £5,000

Smart was imprisoned with eight other people from Insulate Britain (pictured: An Insulate Britain protest) who were given sentences of between three and six months and were each ordered to pay costs of £5,000

It comes as the group today released a statement on behalf of the jailed eco-activist.

Speaking from prison, she said: ‘The window of my cell in the hospital wing is blocked up and there is little natural light, in my previous cell I could see the birds and trees that line the prison fence. 

‘I have less time to go outside in the prison yard for exercise now. 

‘All of this is testing my resolve to continue, but I feel that not eating is the only thing I can do from prison to draw attention to those who will have to make the choice between heating and eating this winter.

‘Not standing by while our government commits treason against the people of this country feels like the most important thing I will do in my life.’

Smart was imprisoned along with eight other Insulate Britain activists who were given sentences of between three and six months after breaching an injunction designed to stop the group’s road-blocking protests.

They were also each ordered to pay costs of £5,000. The court ordered that the jailed activists should serve at least half their sentences. 

A further group of nine people from Insulate Britain have been summoned to appear at the High Court next month to face a charge of contempt of court.

If found guilty, they could be subject to unlimited fines, seizure of assets and prison sentences of up to two years. 

Smart, who was jailed earlier this month, was sent to HMP Bronzefield in Ashford, Surrey.

It was Britain’s first purpose-built prison for women when it opened in 2004.

The eco-activists say prison staff at HMP Bronzefield (pictured), Surrey, have become 'increasingly concerned' about the health of one of its members, Emma Smart

The eco-activists say prison staff at HMP Bronzefield (pictured), Surrey, have become ‘increasingly concerned’ about the health of one of its members, Emma Smart

Smart, who was jailed earlier this month, was sent to HMP Bronzefield in Ashford, Surrey, which was Britain's first purpose-built prison for women when it opened in 2004

Smart, who was jailed earlier this month, was sent to HMP Bronzefield in Ashford, Surrey, which was Britain’s first purpose-built prison for women when it opened in 2004

Up to 572 women inmates can be held at the Category A jail across four houseblocks which can hold about 130 people in each one.

Each wing has a servery unit for women to collect their food, which they can either eat together on the wing or take it back to their rooms. 

Telephones are also provided in each room. It has a 17-bed healthcare facility, and a mother and baby unit for 12 women and 13 babies up to the age of 18 months.

Bronzefield is a privately run prison, operated by the firm Sodexo, who have been approached for comment. 

The Ministry of Justice told MailOnline to contact Sodexo for comment.   

It comes as Smart’s sister, Clare, took to Twitter on Friday to raise concern about her sibling.

Emma Smart (pictured), from Weymouth, announced via an Insulate Britain spokesman that she would be going on hunger strike

Emma Smart (pictured), from Weymouth, announced via an Insulate Britain spokesman that she would be going on hunger strike

She said: ‘Emma is always so strong yet today she was tearful when she phoned. It is really tough to hear her sounding sad.

‘The frustrating delays of not getting any of her belongings; her books, clothes, even her glasses for her to be able to comfortably read the emails that have been printed out. 

‘Each day she is told that it will happen and each day passes without it.’ 

Clare added that her sister wants her voice to be heard and the reasons for her hunger strike to be ‘shouted out loud.’ 

She said: ‘For those that are able to act in solidarity to do so. To not be forgotten about. 

‘To feel that she is continuing to act and to do everything that she can even from inside a prison cell.’ 

Smart was arrested on October 8 along with eight other Insulate Britain activists after four injunctions were granted by the High Court to National Highways in September. 

These banned protests on the M25, around the Port of Dover and on major roads around London.

A fifth injunction was granted to Transport For London on October 8.

Speaking from prison last week, she said in a statement via Insulate Britain: ‘Imprisoning all those who disagree with you is the mark of a bully and we all know that at heart, bullies are cowards.

‘So to the government we say carry on, bring down the combined might of your best lawyers and all the vast machinery of the state. We will not be cowed. 

‘Our numbers are growing because the general public knows we are on the right side of history.’  

In a video shared by Insulate Britain online last week, a short recording of Emma, believed to have been taken before she was sent to prison, can be seen in which she defends her actions and called for more civil disobedience.

Emma Smart told the court that the proceedings were 'obscene' and glowered at barristers representing National Highways. However, the biologist has faced allegations of hypocrisy after undertaking a gas-guzzling 81,000-mile drive across the globe with her husband Andy Smith. Above: The couple are pictured with their diesel-fuelled Toyota before the trip in 2012

Emma Smart told the court that the proceedings were ‘obscene’ and glowered at barristers representing National Highways. However, the biologist has faced allegations of hypocrisy after undertaking a gas-guzzling 81,000-mile drive across the globe with her husband Andy Smith. Above: The couple are pictured with their diesel-fuelled Toyota before the trip in 2012

Insulate Britain eco mob's Emma Smart, 44 previously urged more eco-zealots to step up and continue the group's extreme campaign this week

Insulate Britain eco mob’s Emma Smart, 44 previously urged more eco-zealots to step up and continue the group’s extreme campaign this week

Smart, an ecologist by trade, said: ‘It was quite an extreme campaign, you know, going onto the motorway but we’re in an extreme situation and I felt I had to do what was necessary.

‘I stepped up, we all need to step up. Non-violent civil disobedience is the only way we’re going to enact change.

‘We don’t need nine of us, or 20 of us in prison, we all need to put our liberty on the line because we are facing losing everything.’

In the clip shared to Twitter, Smart explains her actions leading up to taking part in the mob’s motorway protests earlier this year. 

Speaking with a row of fence panels behind her, she said: ‘I don’t know what more I can do and then IB [Insulate Britain] came along and yes, this was a way I could step up. 

‘It was quite an extreme campaign, you know, going onto the motorway but we’re in an extreme situation and I felt I had to do what was necessary.

‘So I feel this is the moment. Our government could have accepted and acted or done something meaningful in relation to our demands.

‘But they chose to imprison us and really that has got to send a strong message to everyone. Now is the time. We need to come together, whatever we’re doing is not enough. 

‘I stepped up, we all need to step up. Non-violent civil disobedience is the only way we’re going to enact change.

‘We don’t need nine of us, or 20 of us in prison, we all need to put our liberty on the line because we are facing losing everything.

‘Our life support systems are collapsing, society is going to collapse. Be part of that change while you have the chance.’ 

During her sentencing, Emma told the court that the proceedings were ‘obscene’ and glowered at barristers representing National Highways. 

However, the biologist has faced allegations of hypocrisy after undertaking a gas-guzzling 81,000-mile drive across the globe with her husband Andy Smith. 

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