Home Sports Common Goal: Adama Traore signs up to Common Goal's anti-racist project

Common Goal: Adama Traore signs up to Common Goal's anti-racist project

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Adama Traore signs up to Juan Mata’s Common Goal initiative as he pledges 1% of his salary to its anti-racist project as he admits football headlines ‘are all too often stolen by racist actions’

  • Wolves winger Adama Traore has signed up to the Common Goal initiative
  • Common Goal is a growing social impact movement which supports and empowers football-based charities around the world
  • Traore has pledged to pay one per cent of his wages to the anti-racist project 


Wolves winger Adama Traore has signed up to Common Goal’s anti-racist project (ARP) as he believes ‘all too often in football the headlines are stolen by racist actions.’

Traore has pledged to pay one per cent of his wages to the initiative, an action-based programme aimed at ending racism in football, which is a part of the growing social impact movement which supports and empowers football-based charities around the world.

There are more than 200 professional players and managers from 45 nationalities on the Juan Mata’s Common Goal team, including Pernille Harder, Paulo Dybala, Vivianne Miedema, Jurgen Klopp and Serge Gnabry. 

Wolves winger Adama Traore has signed up to Common Goal's anti-racist project (ARP)

Wolves winger Adama Traore has signed up to Common Goal’s anti-racist project (ARP)

Traore has pledged to pay one per cent of his wages to the initiative

Traore has pledged to pay one per cent of his wages to the initiative

Influential football figures such as UEFA President Aleksander Ceferin, and the iconic former player Eric Cantona have also joined the movement.

‘All too often in football the headlines are stolen by racist actions. If I’ve learned anything in my career so far, it’s that leading with action rather than empty words is what counts in making a difference,’ Traore said on joining the cause.

‘I’ve become part of Common Goal in order to tackle racism through the anti-racist project. It’s important to me to use my platform to be part of the solution. 

Common Goal was launched in 2017 when Mata, of Manchester United and Spain, committed to pledge one per cent of his salary to a collective fund

Common Goal was launched in 2017 when Mata, of Manchester United and Spain, committed to pledge one per cent of his salary to a collective fund 

WHAT IS COMMON GOAL?

Common Goal is a collective social impact movement in global football created in 2017 by streetfootballworld, the world’s leading organisation in the field of football for good. 

Common Goal enables professional football players, managers, officials and clubs to donate a minimum of one per cent of their earnings to support high-impact initiatives that use football to drive progress towards the Global Goals.

Common Goal’s long-term goal is to positively impact 100 million young people by 2030. As well as the 150 community-based organisations, members also contribute to change via Common Goal collective projects being implemented around the world including playing for peace, driving gender equity, making grassroots sports more inclusive for LGBTQ+ young people as well as the anti-racist project. 

 

‘I know that my one per cent alone isn’t going to fix this problem, and my voice alone won’t solve systemic racism. But, if I can encourage others to join us in this fight, nothing can stand in the way of the impact we can make together.’ 

Common Goal was launched in 2017 when Mata, of Manchester United and Spain, committed to pledge one per cent of his salary to a collective fund that invests in high-impact community organisations using football to empower young people.

Founder Mata added: ‘It’s fantastic to see another person from the Premier League join myself, Kasper Schmeichel and Jurgen Klopp in this growing team.

‘There are so many inspiring female players that are already Common Goal members, and I hope that Adama joining the movement in order to take tangible action on tackling racism will inspire other male colleagues from the Premier League to join the movement. 

‘One per cent is almost nothing, but together we can create meaningful change and the time to act is now.’ 

So far, Common Goal has generated over €4million for high-impact football for good programmes empowering young people all over the world.

The ARP launched in the United States last year with a coalition of industry leaders including clubs such as Chicago Fire, Angel City and Oakland Roots.

Following the success of the ARP in North America, Traore aims to help Common Goal to grow the project in Europe.

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