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‘Best’ time of day to water your garden plants to avoid killing them – not the morning


Gardening is important all year round, but when it comes to the summer months there are a few specific things to focus on – one of them is watering.

Watering plants is an essential task to encourage your stunning blooms to survive and thrive.

According to the plant experts at Phostrogen, every plant is 80 percent water, and the only means of drawing up water is through the roots, meaning proper watering is essential. 

During hot weather, plants and vegetables will get very thirsty, and depending on their location, they may need watering twice a day.

One of the number one mistakes gardeners make at this time of year is watering at the wrong time of day.

Presenter and QVC gardening expert Mark Lane explained how watering plants “at the wrong time” is one of the “worst mistakes” a gardener can make during hot weather. 

So when is the best time to tackle this task? The plant experts at Phostrogen said: “In spring and autumn, water early in the morning, but in the summer, it can be best to wait until the evening as watering during full sun can burn the plants.”

When watering in the evening, there is less chance of evaporation, which means the plant will actually receive all of the water given to it.

However, Mark argued that “the best time” to water plants “is early in the morning when the outdoor temperature is cooler, between 5:00 and 9:00am”. 

As for why he suggests the early hours of the morning, Mark said it will “result in less water lost to evaporation” as the day heats up. 

Whilst the time of day is important, so is the volume of water, and despite plants getting thirsty in the heat, less is definitely more during the hottest temperatures.

Henry Bartlam, founder of Dig said to avoid giving “plants a daily light sprinkling of water”.

Instead, it’s “better to give them a good soak every couple of days (especially in warmer weather) than a quick splash every day”.

He claimed that there is no precise science to this, but if the soil looks nice and damp, and doesn’t dry out quickly, “you’ve probably done a good job”.

However, he warned: “Be careful not to overwater and saturate the soil though – not only could this eventually damage the plants, but also wastes valuable water.”

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